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Urban Healthcare Initiative Program

What is Obesity

Obesity / Overweight

What does it actually mean to be Overweight or Obese?
At their most basic, the word “overweight” and “Obesity” are ways to describe having too much body fat.

In the U.S., among adults under the age of 70, obesity is second only to tobacco in the number of deaths it causes each year. As tobacco use continues to decline, and obesity rates continue to rise, the number of deaths due to obesity may soon exceed that of tobacco.

As reported by the Harvard School of Public health, like tobacco obesity causes or is closely linked with a large number of health conditions, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol, asthma, sleep apnea, gallstones, kidney stones, infertility, and as many as 11 types of cancers, including leukemia, breast, and colon cancer. No less real are the social and emotional effects of obesity, including discrimination, lower wages, lower quality of life and a likely susceptibility to depression.

Obesity isn’t necessarily a permanent condition. Diet, exercise, medications and even surgery can lead to weight loss. Yet it is much much harder to lose weight than it is to gain it. Prevention of obesity, beginning at an early age and extending across a lifespan could vastly improve individual and public health, reduce suffering, and save billions of dollars each year in health care costs.

For more information: www.Obesity.org

 

SOME COMPLICATIONS CAUSED BY OBESITY

HEALTH RISK CAUSED BY OBESITY (click here to read more)

  • Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high.
  • High blood pressure. …
  • Heart disease. …
  • Stroke. …
  • Sleep apnea. …
  • Metabolic syndrome. …
  • Fatty liver diseases. …
  • Osteoarthritis. …
  • Gallbladder diseases. …
  • Some cancers. …
OBESITY WEBSITE RESOURCES

Body Mass Index Chart

Overview

Obesity is a complex disease involving an excessive amount of body fat. Obesity isn’t just a cosmetic concern. It’s a medical problem that increases the risk of other diseases and health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and certain cancers.

There are many reasons why some people have difficulty losing weight. Usually, obesity results from inherited, physiological and environmental factors, combined with diet, physical activity and exercise choices.

The good news is that even modest weight loss can improve or prevent the health problems associated with obesity. A healthier diet, increased physical activity and behavior changes can help you lose weight. Prescription medications and weight-loss procedures are additional options for treating obesity.

Symptoms

Body mass index (BMI) is often used to diagnose obesity. To calculate BMI, multiply weight in pounds by 703, divide by height in inches and then divide again by height in inches. Or divide weight in kilograms by height in meters squared.

BMI Weight status
Below 18.5 Underweight
18.5-24.9 Normal
25.0-29.9 Overweight
30.0 and higher Obesity

Asians with BMI of 23 or higher may have an increased risk of health problems.

For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. However, BMI doesn’t directly measure body fat, so some people, such as muscular athletes, may have a BMI in the obesity category even though they don’t have excess body fat.

Many doctors also measure a person’s waist circumference to help guide treatment decisions. Weight-related health problems are more common in men with a waist circumference over 40 inches (102 centimeters) and in women with a waist measurement over 35 inches (89 centimeters).

When to see a doctor

If you’re concerned about your weight or weight-related health problems, ask your doctor about obesity management. You and your doctor can evaluate your health risks and discuss your weight-loss options.

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